Teaching Strategies that Explain the Supreme Court

In this politically tumultuous time, a presidential election year when even the safest of political discourse becomes controversial, it’s imperative that your students, no doubt bombarded with rhetoric from all directions, understand how the political process works.

With a Supreme Court vacancy now leaving the nation’s highest court down a justice, now is the rare opportunity for your students to learn exactly how the Supreme Court works.
So today on TeachHUB.com, frequent contributing writer Jacqui Murray, who is a teach teacher based in Northern California, points out six websites that illuminate users on the intricacies of the Supreme Court, including:


Jacqui sums up her article like this: “Use all of these in your curriculum. Start with the first four as background sites. Once students are familiar with the Supreme Court, test their new knowledge with the games. This is a great way to infuse authenticity into a current events topic that likely will dominate the news cycle.”

How do you teach the Supreme Court to your students? Let us know!


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